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Posted on 08 April 2012 by tomatocasual.com

Oysters with Tomatoes, Citrus and Chiles

By David Harbilas

This is a fairly simple recipe that relies on very few ingredients and little cooking.

The real star is not the tomatoes but the seafood.

Buy the very freshest oysters possible.

I just did a special menu for the New Year and bought oysters that were just four days out of the water. When I shucked them open they smelled like seawater, just as a fresh oyster should. It’s not too much to ask your fishmonger to tell you when the oysters were harvested, as well as the location.

In fact, they are obligated by law to keep that information on hand, and if they are unable to tell you go elsewhere. That being said, a really good, briny oyster benefits from simple parings of sweet, hot, and slightly sour. This dish offers that.

Enough for 12 oysters

12 oysters, scrubbed
2 globe tomatoes, peeled and cut into filets (see note)
1 teaspoon chile powder Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 02 February 2012 by tomatocasual.com

Oysters with Tomatoes, Citrus and Chiles

By David Harbilas

This dish is all about austerity and the ingredients, which is kind of a shame because while oysters seem to be very much of the moment in the cold months tomatoes are, clearly, not about winter.

Yet citrus, oddly enough, is a winter fruit, and what better way to off-set the acid of citrus than with the sweetness of tomatoes?

The entire dish is raw, save the cured tomatoes, which are little more than seasoned tomato filets. Yet the combination of cool, spicy, and sweet is unforgettable.

Serves 2-3

4-6 oysters, shucked, left in shell
2 plum tomatoes
1 moro orange, or some other variety (such as navel), cut into segments Read the rest of this entry »

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Posted on 18 January 2011 by tomatocasual.com

Tomatoes and Olive Recipes

tomato-sauce7By David Harbilas

To me, tomatoes and olives are perfect companions: one is salty, the other sweet; one is forgiving, the other angry toward some palettes.

Each, however, has a certain affinity for tartness.

The pairing is also adept with a number of cooking methods, from raw, to roasted, to stewed, as well as a number of textures.

Whether it is in a salsa, cooked sauce, a paste to spread on a sandwich, or soup, olives and tomatoes are natural mates in all seasons. Here are three simple preparations.

Tomato-Olive and Citrus Salsa

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